Bird Nest Clipart: 19th and Early 20th Century

Did I mention I’m drowning in vintage illustrations?

I’ve been stocking up on antique die-cuts and struck gold with these illustrations ideal for bird nest clipart. Plus, I found egg illustrations for specific species, like the Bulfinch eggs pictured above.

Getting ready for the scanner!

 

There are a lot of projects you can use these for. Animal flashcards, Easter basket add-ons, dioramas, Valentines, and art assignments are just a few ideas that come to mind.

And before I forget…

*In website housekeeping news: stay on the look out for a new miscellaneous gallery section, master gallery, and revamped holiday galleries in the coming weeks. 

Okay – back to birdies! Here’s a look at four more vintage illustrations of birds, nests, and eggs. And some more freebies I picked up along the way.

Free Tutorials: How to Make a Bird’s Nest

Want to make your own nests similar to the bird nest clipart above? Check out the following tutorials to make your own nests for school, decor, and other creative projects:

How to Draw a Bird’s Nest

Need to draw a bird’s nest for an assignment or video game? There are several types of nests to choose from. Styles include spheres, cups, platforms, mounds, burrows, scrapes, and cavity-nesting. You can learn more in this in-depth Spruce guide.

Here’s a YouTube video tutorial on how to draw a simple bird’s nest:

7 School Projects You Can Do with Bird Nest Clipart

Vintage animal illustrations are ideal for school and art classes. Here are 7 creative projects you do with antique bird illustrations:

  1. Avian (bird) science diorama
  2. Bird species flashcards
  3. Storyboarding
  4. Stop-motion animation
  5. Book report cover
  6. Bird posters for the classroom
  7. word-image association

Is your project ready to take flight? Don’t forget to check the FAQ page and terms page to get the scoop on image usage. If you like what I’m doing and want to see more vintage illustrations, give this site a like on Facebook and share on social media.

Stay tuned for more 🙂

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Fall Illustrations: 19th Century Autumn Leaves and Scenery

Vintage pumpkin illustration from a 19th century postcard in the public domain

Happy Sunday!

I just got back from Thacher park, and yep, the fall colors were definitely awesome.

The New York State Library also has some neat autumn images of their own. These fall illustrations come from the library’s public domain collection and span the 19th century.

I cleaned these images up in Pixlr but you can find the originals under the ‘autumn’ and ‘fall leaves’ tags in the NYPL database.

A 19th century fall illustration of a house on a lake in autumn - public domain

Why Do the Leaves Change in Fall?

Good question!

Here’s what National Geographic has to say about it:

Evergreen trees, for example, are coniferous, so they have a protective waxy coating on their leaves which protects them during winter. Deciduous trees like birch and maple don’t have that protective coating, so they shed their leaves in fall.

Fall illustrations of autumn leaves in the public domain

But What Makes Them Change Color?

Before deciduous trees shed their leaves, they have to pull whatever nutrients they can, like nitrogen.

During this time, leaves also slow down photosynthesis and chlorophyll production (which is responsible for that leafy green color.) This gives carotenoids their time to shine, as these are the natural warm-colored pigments hiding beneath chlorophyll.

The process of recouping more nitrogen and phosphorus, coupled with the slowing down of photosynthesis, is what creates the beautiful fall colors we know and love.

More Free Resources for Fall

Need ideas for fall? Check out the links below!

19th Century Illustrations of African Wildlife

19th century color illustration of a rhinoceros in Africa

It’s Saturday! And I’m ready to spend some much-need quality time in the public domain.

So I was reading up on Africa’s animals and ecology and fell down another rabbit hole.

I whipped up this post from my pile of vintage scraps at home, an African scenery book from 1804, and a vintage zoological journal. These images span early to mid-late 19th century, putting them in the public domain.

Of my scraps, several are originally from old cigarette boxes and advertisements for everyday objects.

5 Awesome Projects You Can Do with Free Safari Illustrations

The holidays are right around the corner, so now’s a good time to start brainstorming DIY gifts, make-your-own school 19th century zebra from vintage advertisement - public domainsupplies, greeting cards, gifts for crafters, and a whole host of fun stuff.

Animal Alphabet Flashcards

Print-Your-Own Animal Wrapping Paper

DIY Safari Greeting Cards for Birthday Parties 

Hidden Picture Games and Artwork

DIY Shrinky Dinks!

 

19th century vintage print of a zebra study - public domain

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Zebras

  • There are three species of zebra: Burchell’s zebra (also know as a plains zebra), Grevy’s zebra, and the Equus zebra.
  • So why do zebras have stripes? There have been several theories, but recent studies reveal that stripes may have evolved to keep zebras cool.
  • Zebras will often socialize with antelope herds for protection.
  • Like your fingerprints, no two zebras will have the same stripes.
  • Each zebra species has their own stripe patterns, varying in width. Zebras that live on the southern plains have stripes that are further apart.

Get 15 more fascinating facts on zebras from the Mother Nature Network!

19th century color illustration of African scenery with elephants - public domain

More Free Resources About African Animals and Ecology

19th century vintage illustration of leopard - public domain

The web is packed with free resources on African animals, ecology, environment, safari, and more. Bookmark the following for your next project.

Fairies & Elves: Richard Doyle’s 19th-Century Fairyland Illustrations

Elves, fairies, and insects in Richard Doyle In Fairyland (1870)

I’m back from a long hiatus!

Thank you to everyone who visits and shares this website. I hope everyone likes this latest batch of free vintage illustrations.

So let’s get to it 🙂

There are so many more things I want to add to this site, one of them being more elves and fairies.

I’ve been aware of Richard Doyle’s In Fairyland illustrations for a while now, so I got my hands on some from public domain collections at various libraries.

This guy is definitely a public domain stand-out.

You can learn more about Doyle’s In Fairyland series at the Met’s public domain page.

Three elves battling a giant grasshopper in Richard Doyle's In Fairyland.

Fairies and elves clash with nature in this fun, vibrant series. Originally published in 1870.

A vintage color illustration of an elf with owls and birds.

Richard “Dickie” Doyle was born in Cambridge Terrace, London, in 1824 to notable Irish political caricaturist, John Doyle. Richard had no formal art training outside of his father’s own studio and guidance. At an early age, he showed a particular fondness for the fantasy genre.

Two fairies flying through the sky with a butterfly leaf chariot.

5 Fun Facts About Elves and Fairies

According to Encyclopedia.com,

  • The word “fairy” comes from the Latin word, Fata or fate.
  •  In folklore, they’re depicted as both helpful and potentially harmful to humans. But always mischevious in manner!
  • “Fairy tradition” or “fairy culture” is strongest in the British Isles. However, fairies appear in stories from Africa to Asia as well.
  • Many fairy stories present fairyland as a place where time stops or slows down considerably. This is evidenced by humans (mortals) who’re kicked out of fairyland after a year, only to return to the human world where several years have passed.
  • In 1927, an actual Fairy Investigation Society was established to document and study possible fairy sightings.

A vintage elf and fairy kissing near a mushroom in Fairyland.

This last image shows two of Doyles infamous fairies kissing in Fairyland. Perfect for Valentines Day!

19th Century Decorative Design Illustrations

antique-decorative-design-illustration-3 antique-decorative-design-illustration-4

I love antique art books, especially art supply catalogs and instructional materials.

The 19th-century book, The Art of Decorative Design, discusses symmetry in nature and botany when designing decorative collectibles, motifs, etc. I just skimmed around honestly, so there’s definitely more to it than that. I saw another chapter that talked about how to express emotion in decorative design which looked interesting too. You can check out the entire book here.

There were a few illustrations that caught my eye, so I cropped and brightened them up a bit for you to use. I thought these would make great stencil designs for screen printing. You could also use them for invitations, playing card designs, stamp designs, mixed media painting, and other fun stuff.

Vintage Book Illustrations of British Mammals

Free to use vintage book illustration of British Fox Free vintage book illustration of British Squirrel

I think it’s time to add more animals to this site, don’t you think?

Good because I found this awesome antique book packed with British mammal illustrations from the early 20th century!

Published in 1920, British Mammals features more than 50 color plates and pen ink illustrations of Britain’s most recognized mammals.

I picked out my personal favorites, a walrus, fox, hedgehog, squirrel, and wildcat, then made a few quick edits using Pixlr.

These illustrations are perfect for magnets, postcards, coffee mugs, school flashcards, posters, and images for your blog.

Keep reading to learn more about the book’s illustrator, Archibald Thorburn.

Free antique illustration of a British Hedgehog Antique book illustration of British wildcat - free to use

An antique book illustration of a British Walrus

About The Artist: Archibald Thorburn

  • Archibald Thorburn was born in 1860 in Hascombe, Surrey in the UK.
  • He was of Scottish descent and frequently visited Scotland to paint its floral and fauna.
  • His favorite place in Scotland to paint was the Forest of Gaick.
  • Archibald’s father, Robert Thorburn, was a miniature portrait artist and worked for Queen Victoria.
  • His work was frequently shown at the Royal Academy.
  • He regularly painted birds, and in 1899, he created the first official Christmas Card for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.

Antique Summer: Vintage Illustrations of Fresh Strawberries

I’m officially obsessed with summer now. Since yesterday, I’ve been on a quest to find and edit classic vintage images for your summer projects. I’m really lucky that so many awesome turn-of-the-century gardening catalogs and magazines featured vibrant illustrations of strawberries on their covers! With that being said, I grabbed my favorite free imaging editing tool, Pixlr, and went to work. I was able to create more vintage strawberry clipart by simply cutting up and editing these old antique gardening publications.

They’re ideal for DIY invitations, greeting cards, thank you notes, printed fabric, Etsy, and decoupage for old furniture. For more creative ideas, check out these strawberry-inspired projects!