6 Iceberg Illustrations from the 19th-Century

It’s getting colder and I can’t wait for snow!

I’ve also been spending some serious quality time with the British Library’s public domain collection. They have awesome vintage iceberg illustrations, along with arctic animals, igloos, and more illustrations from 19th-century arctic expeditions.

Arctic foxes, penguins, walrus, and more cold-weather animals are definitely on the way. In the meantime, check out these sweet vintage glacier images (love that sunset iceberg above!)

Where Do Icebergs Come From?

So, how exactly do icebergs form?

Let’s ask our friends at the National Snow and Ice Data Center:

  • Icebergs are formed when large chunks of ice sheet break off from glaciers. In case you were wondering the difference between an iceberg and a glacier.
  • Icebergs vary in size, ranging from “ice cubes” to over 4,000 square miles!
  • Smaller icebergs, known as “growlers”, are actually more dangerous since they’re difficult to spot at night.
  • Scientists study breaks in icebergs to learn more about climates and ocean currents.
  • The most “significant ice shelf” in Antarctica is Larson C, as a 2,000 square mile iceberg is expected to break off in the near future.

19th century iceberg illustrations in the public domain

 

Iceberg Illustrations Source: 19th Century Arctic Expeditions

The vintage illustrations in this post depict arctic travels, voyages, and fictionalized scenes from the 19th century. Featured in such titles as “The Frozen Crew of the Ice-Bound  Ship” and “A Voyage of Discovery, made under the orders of the Admiralty, in his Majesty’s ships Isabella and Alexander….”

More Free Resources for Icebergs and Glaciers!

Want even more free arctic stuff? Who doesn’t? Check out the following tips, printables, illustrations, stock photos, media, and graphics below.

Iceberg science activity for kids

Free stock photos of icebergs

Free iceberg vector art

Crayola glacier coloring page

Arctic animals coloring book

Preschool printables – arctic animals

Arctic flashcards

Free eBooks about the arctic

Free documentaries about the arctic

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Late 19th-Century Illustrations of Gems and Precious Stones

Who loves rocks and minerals? Free scientific illustrations of rocks and minerals

I most certainly do 🙂

Recently, I went to the latest gems and minerals show held at the New York State Museum. It was awesome.

And a few years ago I was lucky enough to attend the rocks and minerals show in Tuscan, Arizona, the largest of its kind in the United States. That was an awesome show too, as I came away with some great mini trilobites at a fraction of the price.

Tip: vendors ALWAYS discount on the last day!

Anyways, I’m getting off track. I clearly had rocks and minerals on the brain, so I went searching through 19th-century mineralogy books and found some wonderful illustrations for you to use and share.

These are my favorite illustrations from the book, Gems and Precious Stones of North America. But you can view the entire book here where you’ll find more images too.

Antique rocks and minerals illustrations

 

Who Wrote This Book Anyway?

The vintage book, Gems and Precious Stones of North America, was written and illustrated by the 19th-century mineralogist, George Frederick Kunz.

Kunz was born in 1856 in New York City and harbored a love for rocks and minerals from an early age.

In fact, by the time he was a teenager, Kunz had collected thousands of specimens and sold them to the University of Minnesota.

Though a working mineralogist and collector, Kunz never went to college to pursue a degree in the field. Instead, he taught himself through his own field research and whatever mineralogy books he could find.

By 23, Kunz was already vice president of Tiffany & Co.

During his tenure with Tiffany & Co., Kunz discovered a new gem which was aptly named, Kunzite.

Kunz founded the Museums of the Peaceful Arts, was president of the American Metric Association, and was a lead research curator for the Museum of Natural History in New York City.

vintage illustrations of precious stones and gems

Shop For Rocks & Mineral Gifts

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