Antique Art Supplies and Vintage Color Charts

It’s almost summer! Time for pools, shorts, soft serve ice cream, and of course, creativity! Summer is the perfect time to finally start that novel, children’s book, animation, or video game.

One of my favorite things to do during summer is to paint outside with a simple canvas and easel. Feeling nostalgic, I went on what I thought would be an impossible hunt for free vintage illustrations of art supplies. But I lucked out and found this awesome antique art supply catalog from 1906 that’s packed with drawings of antique art pencils, inks, chalks, art sets, and vibrant color charts. I went through the catalog and picked out my favorites, then I brightened them up a bit with Pixlr.

Incorporate them into your next collage or find inspiration for hidden object video games, greeting cards for artists, Etsy products, and more!

Did You Know?

  • Pencil “lead” is actually graphite. The term originated from the Greek word, graphein, which means “to write!”
  • The actual origin of pencils themselves can be traced back to mid-1500s England. There, a large graphite deposit was discovered which lead to the creation of the pencil we commonly use today. Drawing pencils started to grow in popularity during the 17th century.
  • Many scholars believe that the first easels were actually used by ancient Egyptians!
  • One of the earliest known art supplies is the classic paintbrush. Anthropologists discovered proof of paint brush use in paleolithic caves in Europe.
  • Archaeologists revealed that oil paints were used in Afghanistan as far back as the 7th century!

 

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Free Vintage Illustrations for St. Patrick’s Day: Corned Beef, Cabbage, and Potatoes

There’s another crafty holiday on the horizon! With St. Patrick’s Day around the corner, I’m reminded of when my grandma would make corned beef, cabbage, and potatoes for dinner. I went on an epic search and found some great clippings from vintage catalogs, seed advertisements, antique trading cards, and magazines and cleaned them up a bit with Pixlr. Feel free to include them in your St. Patrick’s day blog posts, school projects, art projects, and Etsy gifts, or pair these illustrations with some of my previous posts about food to create a detailed collage. This post also got me thinking about the history of this traditional Irish meal, and I learned some things that I did not expect. Find out below!

Fun Facts about Corned Beef and Cabbage!

  • Pork was actually the meat of choice for Irish immigrants first immigrating to America, specifically smoked pork loin. It was cheap to get in Ireland, but not so much in the United States. Therefore, people got creative and started cooking beef. Irish immigrants were inspired to make corned beef after visiting the markets of Jewish Immigrants in New York City. Their corned beef had a similar taste and cured preparation to the popular Irish cut smoked pork back home.
  • The addition of cabbage was new. Irish families discovered that adding cabbage to a salty corned beef stew made a hearty and delicious meal that was also cost effective.
  • This meal eventually became a popular meal in American households across the country. In fact, it was even served at President Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration!

 

These images were curated and edited from archived vintage publications and advertisements in the public domain. You are free to use these images in your personal, commercial, and educational work without permission. A link back to FreeVintageIllustrations.com is required if you share these images anywhere online. 

 

 

Free Vintage Illustrations of Ice Cream Treats from a 1922 Trade Journal

Who wants ice cream for breakfast? I do! I found an old vintage Ice Cream trade journal from 1922, and it was packed with awesome antique advertisements for commercial Ice Cream Makers, advertising services for Ice Cream distributors, and various Ice Cream brands, flavors, sundaes, and cones. There were like 3 Neapolitan bar ads! Needless to say, I ran away with a fun, colorful collection of free vintage illustrations to share. I know it’s chilly in December, but I can never turn by back on ice cream. Ever. These vintage ice cream illustrations and advertisements can also be used to make unique ornaments for a cool ice cream themed Christmas tree, t-shirt designs, DIY bag designs, digital flyers, Etsy gifts, and more creative projects.

Vintage illustrations come with a story. Curious about the vintage ice cream industry and other facts about your favorite dessert? Learn more interesting facts and history below!

Ice Cream History and Facts

  • Catherine Medici, of Italy’s famous Medici’s of the Renaissance, is often credited with introducing ice cream to French culture when she married Henri II. Though the claim is not documented.
  • American Ice Cream origins are often credited to Martha Washington, Thomas Jefferson for allegedly bringing Ice Cream from France to the U.S., and even former first lady, Dolly Madison.
  • The ancient Romans mixed crushed ice with berries
  • Many scholars believe that ice cream was most likely invented in China. There are even accounts of frozen milk as early as the 7th century! There are also additional written accounts of ice cream being served at a royal court function in the 14th century.
  • Word about ice cream might have spread through China, to the Middle East, and eventually to Italy. However, many scholars believe that the practice of freezing food itself was more likely spread from china than ice cream itself.
  • The earliest written accounts of ice cream in English culture comes from a 1671 account of a banquet with King Charles II.
  • English cuisine officially introduced ice cream and ice cream recipes around 1718
  • Ice cream hit the United States in the early 1700s, with accounts of ice cream being made and served amongst the colonies.
  • Early ice cream makers in the early 18th century were referred to as a cream machine for ice.